Owner of Wolfgang’s Vault in Legal Battle Over Streaming Rights

Blog, Copyright, Legal, Music, Streaming

A music archive regarded as one of the most important collections from the golden age of rock – thousands of tapes and videos featuring such artists as Pink Floyd, the Rolling Stones, the Grateful Dead, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix and Fleetwood Mac – is at the centre of a legal dispute in which Keith Richards and Pete Townshend could be called to testify in a Manhattan courtroom.

The dispute focuses on Wolfgang’s Vault, a concert-streaming service and memorabilia marketplace that owns the archives of Bill Graham, a rock promoter without whom the 60s music scene in San Francisco and New York might have looked very different.

Read Article: The Guardian

Rights and the Evolution of Music Streaming

Blog, Copyright, Music, Streaming

iphone-music-300x199One thing has become obvious over the last couple of years — on-demand streaming has won. Pandora did well for a number of years with its personalized radio experience but after a certain point, it arguably just created demand for a truly personalized service where users could control exactly what they wanted to listen to.

Apparently, having an algorithm guess at what you might like to hear next is not quite as good as allowing the user to make more granular decisions. In addition, Pandora benefited from the unique royalty model in the US but that also made it hard to export its business model elsewhere.

Meanwhile, Spotify has eclipsed Pandora’s user numbers and, adding in Apple Music, Deezer, Rhapsody and others, makes clear which way the wind is blowing – Pandora’s model has stalled, while on-demand streaming is the future. Hence, Pandora’s acquisition of Rdio and the pursuit of rights for on-demand streaming.

Source: Tech.pinions

Enough With The Lawsuits: Berklee, MIT Lead Effort To Create Ownership Rights Database For Music Industry

Blog, Business, Copyright, Music, Streaming

Berklee College of Music and the MIT Media Lab are leading a new initiative they hope will one day solve complicated, expensive music industry issues involving licensing, distribution and ownership rights.Big names are signing on, including Spotify, Pandora, YouTube, Netflix, Soundcloud, NPR (and WBUR), as well as major record label/entertainment groups Sony, Universal and Warner.

If it succeeds, this broad constellation of players believes it could change the many-layered, multi-organism music ecosystem as we know it.

Source: The ARTery