Opinion: Taylor Swift’s Streaming Service Would Not be Successful

The world doesn’t need another streaming service. Between Spotify, Apple Music and the more niche Tidal, consumers already have enough options to choose from to listen to and download their music.

Listeners shouldn’t be expected to spread themselves across so many platforms. If the goal for artists is to make streaming services profitable, then the solution isn’t to make your own platform. Instead, it would be to condense into a singular site to have the greatest amount of listeners and therefore the most plays and downloads. Tidal and “Swifties,” as Swift’s site is rumored to be called, will separate a relatively large market. Swift will in turn distance herself from a bigger audience rather than create a larger one.

Consumers want all of their products to be in one place. Kindle enables a singular book library, Netflix holds an incredibly large movie and TV collection and Spotify has a huge music selection. Having multiple niche streaming services is a step backwards for the industry.

Read Article: Daily Free Press

Retailer Fnac Possible Shareholder in Deezer

French music and books retailer Fnac-Darty and music streaming site Deezer on Tuesday unveiled a strategic alliance, which could see Fnac becoming a Deezer shareholder within three years.

The deal will help Deezer compete better both in France and abroad with bigger rivals such as Spotify and Apple Music , while it will help Fnac-Darty, which competes with online retail giant Amazon, to improve its offering of music and video streamed online.

A spokesman for Fnac-Darty said the partnership will be reviewed after three years, at which time the group will decide on whether or not it buys a stake in Deezer. Continue reading Retailer Fnac Possible Shareholder in Deezer

The Cheapskate’s Guide to Music Streaming

When Apple launched the iTunes Music Store in 2003, it decreed that every song would cost just 99 cents.

That was a striking level of uniformity to apply to an industry that has often offered its product at varying prices based on the star power of an artist, the whims of retailers, and the general willingness of consumers to pay up. The average price of an album (in 2015 dollars) fell from $24.45 in 1974 to $11.97 in 2014, according to an analysis by Pitchfork.The single-track download is dying, but the format replacing it has found its own standardized price: $9.99 per month.

Over the years, music streaming services have settled on a Hamilton per month as the appropriate price for streaming millions of songs on demand and having the ability to listen to them offline.

Read Article: The Ringer

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Music Streaming Surging in Germany

A big boost in streaming audio revenues helped Germany’s music market grow 2.4% in 2016 despite falling sales of CDs and digital downloads.

Music Industry Sales Share in Germany, by Format, 2016 (% of total)According to music industry trade group Bundesverband Musikindustrie (BVMI), music sales in Germany reached €1.58 billion ($1.75 billion) in 2016, marking the fourth consecutive year of growth for the country’s music business.

Digital formats’ share of the total rose to 38.0%.

Read Article: eMarketer

Music Streaming Hailed as Industry’s Saviour as Labels Enjoy Profit Surge

Five years ago, the demise of the music industry seemed almost inevitable. Recession, rampant piracy, falling CD sales and a fear that “kids just don’t buy music any more” had giant record labels, once oozing wealth, counting the pennies. Yet 2016 has seen a reversal of fortune – and the industry’s saviour is not what many predicted. Profits from music streaming, first championed by Spotify and now offered by Apple and Amazon, have given some labels their largest surge in revenue in more than a decade.

Read Article: The Guardian

Japan’s Pop Music Scene Saw a Power Struggle in 2016

Media, both domestic and overseas, spent a lot of time focused on the streaming services arriving in Japan in 2016. Months of “Can these platforms thrive in CD-loving Japan?” speculation reached a climax in September, when global market leader Spotify finally debuted here. There was a big press conference, launch parties and one final flurry of articles pondering if this could be the sea change so many thirst for in the country’s music industry.

One problem, though — that shift already happened, via digital platforms that arrived in Japan years ago, and which became pop cultural forces over the course of this year.

Source: The Japan Times