The Cheapskate’s Guide to Music Streaming

When Apple launched the iTunes Music Store in 2003, it decreed that every song would cost just 99 cents.

That was a striking level of uniformity to apply to an industry that has often offered its product at varying prices based on the star power of an artist, the whims of retailers, and the general willingness of consumers to pay up. The average price of an album (in 2015 dollars) fell from $24.45 in 1974 to $11.97 in 2014, according to an analysis by Pitchfork.The single-track download is dying, but the format replacing it has found its own standardized price: $9.99 per month.

Over the years, music streaming services have settled on a Hamilton per month as the appropriate price for streaming millions of songs on demand and having the ability to listen to them offline.

Read Article: The Ringer

Apple, Spotify Head Back to SXSW as Subscription Wars Heat Up

Music and tech fans are making their annual pilgrimage to Austin, Texas, this week for the South By Southwest (SXSW) festival.

What began 30 years ago as a showcase for local musicians has morphed into a must attend event for startup entrepreneurs and musical talent alike.“The way they’ve structured the festival is pretty genius,” Canadian-born entrepreneur and musician Jared Gutstadt told BNN in a phone interview. Gutstadt — president, chief creative officer and co-founder of audio creative agency Jingle Punks — is a long-time SXSW attendee. T

his year, his firm will be marketing its partnership with iHeartRadio to create radio jingles on behalf of brands.

Read Article: BNN

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Snap May Get Music Where Facebook and Others Failed

The last social network to truly “get” music was MySpace — unfortunately, they didn’t get much else.

Today’s biggest player, Facebook, doesn’t “get” music — and artists still don’t really use it. Even though they have the biggest audience and market cap in the space, they are a Menlo Park, Calif.-based company with a Silicon Valley culture.

No disrespect at all, but through my time in the valley, for all the positives and successes it has, understanding the science of cool and culture isn’t one of them.

Read Article: TechCrunch

Spotify Acquires Audio Detection Startup Sonalytic

Streaming music service Spotify announced this morning it has acquired a company called Sonalytic, makers of an audio detection technology that can identify songs, mixed content and audio clips, as well as track copyright-protected material, and aid in music discovery.

These features line up with services that Spotify offers, making Sonalytic a natural fit for the company, it seems.

Spotify doesn’t provide much detail on its plans for integrating Sonalytic with its service, only saying that its audio detection feature will be used to do things like improve personalized playlists and match songs with compositions to improve its publishing data system. The company also teases that users can “stay tuned” for new products that will come to market, thanks to Sonalytic’s help.

Read Article: TechCrunch

Owner of Wolfgang’s Vault in Legal Battle Over Streaming Rights

A music archive regarded as one of the most important collections from the golden age of rock – thousands of tapes and videos featuring such artists as Pink Floyd, the Rolling Stones, the Grateful Dead, Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix and Fleetwood Mac – is at the centre of a legal dispute in which Keith Richards and Pete Townshend could be called to testify in a Manhattan courtroom.

The dispute focuses on Wolfgang’s Vault, a concert-streaming service and memorabilia marketplace that owns the archives of Bill Graham, a rock promoter without whom the 60s music scene in San Francisco and New York might have looked very different.

Read Article: The Guardian

SoundCloud’s New Fee Could Be Transformative

Undercutting rival Spotify and others in the industry, SoundCloud is offering consumers music for $4.99 a month. This price is 50% lower than what Spotify offers, according to Bloomberg News.

Yet with both SoundCloud and Spotify being in the red, some are insisting that the lower $4.99 charge could be key for SoundCloud and Spotify to attract more paying users and to make money.

Read Article: Investopedia