Change Is Afoot In Music Video

sz_header_image-1Music video’s two power players are both in the news for strategic resets. On the one hand YouTube has announced that it is merging its YouTube Music and Google Play Music teams while on the other hand Vevo has announced it is postponing the launch of its subscription service in favour of prioritising global expansion. These are both important developments in their own rights but together form part of a changing narrative for music video.

Music video is streaming music’s killer app. According to MIDiA’s latest consumer survey, 45% of consumers watch music videos on YouTube or Vevo every month, while 25% of consumers use YouTube for music every week (more than any of the streaming audio services). So what YouTube and Vevo do has real impact.

Read Article: Music Industry Blog

Why Do Streaming TV Shows Like Hulu’s ‘The Path’ Take a Whole Season to Pay off?

The television industry is currently in the middle of a radical paradigm shift, as streaming networks like Amazon, Netflix, and Hulu look to create as much original content as possible. One of the most notable changes evident in the flood of new content is the total abandonment of the long-accepted idea that a show needs to hook a viewer in its first act, or at least its first episode.

But streaming shows like The Path, Bloodline, Hand of God, Love, Sense8, and many others are taking this to extremes, seeming barely concerned with letting stories pay off until viewers have sat through a whole season.

Source: The Atlantic

Fullscreen Creates Ad-Free Video Subscription Service

Fullscreen, the popular YouTube network majority owned by AT&T and the Chernin Group, is introducing an ad-free video on demand service, a move that it says is the “first video membership experience programmed for the social-first generation.”

The $4.99-per-month subscription will feature scripted and unscripted original content as well as movies and TV shows from the ’80s and ’90s like “Saved by the Bell,” offerings that are all part of a move to draw in young viewers who follow social-media stars. The service will debut with more than 800 hours of content, according to Fullscreen, and will be available online and via the iPhone, iPad, select Android Phones and Chromecast.

Source: AdAge

Facebook and Twitter in Race to Acquire Rights to Stream Live TV

download11Facebook and Twitter are battling to win the right to stream conventional TV programming, The Post has learned. Both companies, eager to ramp up their capacity to deliver compelling live streaming video, have approached programmers about a deal for such rights, several sources familiar with the situation said.

Facebook, which is already pitching the NFL to acquire rights to a new Thursday Night Football digital package, has been in meetings with a wide variety of TV executives over the past few weeks, sources said.Late last year, it created a new product, “Facebook Live,” something akin to YouTube, sources said.

Source: New York Post

MovieSwap: Company Wants to Make Online Movie Sharing Legal with DVDs

Sharing copyrighted movies online is not legal, and rights owners are still furious about the amount of piracy out there — though many studies have shown that illegal downloads don’t cut into their bottom lines.

Of course, sharing DVDs with friends and family is perfectly legal and nobody will come after you for that.

What if a brand new streaming service took that approach to the next level? What if you could share your DVDs with millions of “friends” from around the world, and watch their DVDs just as you’d watch content on Netflix?

There’s a new movie streaming service called MovieSwap that wants to make DVD movie sharing popular again, but with a modern twist that’s likely to enrage movie studios.

Source: BGR

FCC Digs Into How Restrictive Cable Contracts are Preventing Streaming TV Options

If you’re wondering why most TV channels haven’t branched out with new online streaming services, you’re not alone.

The Federal Communications Commission is now examining how contracts with cable companies can prevent TV networks from launching Internet channels, the Wall Street Journal reports. The story, which cites media firms and unnamed “industry insiders,” reaffirms the idea that TV networks would face repercussions if they offered their services outside of a pay TV bundle.

Source: TechHive

Why Time Warner Now Owns Three Streaming Services

Time Warner’s latest salvo in the battle against cord-cutters: buying a streaming service specializing in Korean soap operas.

Warner Bros.’ Feb. 23 deal to acquire the streamer DramaFever might seem a bit unorthodox because it provides primarily English-language audiences access to international programming. But the real play is for the New York-based company’s technology and its ambitions to operate a slate of streaming channels.

It already powers horror-themed Shudder, which former DramaFever investor AMC launched in the summer, and the documen­tary streaming service SundanceNow Doc Club.

Source: Hollywood Reporter

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