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Oh yeah, and there’s also the folks who actually play the music! We’ll keep an eye on how the artists are dealing with the new world of music streaming.

“Streaming Has Officially Taken Over the Music Business.” That was TIME Magazine’s headline in March ’16. We couldn’t agree more! What better time to dive in to All Things Music Streaming with Platform & Stream.

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Spotify Acquires Audio Detection Startup Sonalytic

Streaming music service Spotify announced this morning it has acquired a company called Sonalytic, makers of an audio detection technology that can identify songs, mixed content and audio clips, as well as track copyright-protected material, and aid in music discovery.

These features line up with services that Spotify offers, making Sonalytic a natural fit for the company, it seems.

Spotify doesn’t provide much detail on its plans for integrating Sonalytic with its service, only saying that its audio detection feature will be used to do things like improve personalized playlists and match songs with compositions to improve its publishing data system. The company also teases that users can “stay tuned” for new products that will come to market, thanks to Sonalytic’s help.

Read Article: TechCrunch

Can Blockchain Make Music Great Again?

Blockchain technology can’t write songs or play instruments – at least not yet. But, it might be able to ensure that those who do get the proper credit and compensation, a problem that has always bedeviled this $15bn industry.

Since the start of the 2017 alone, both The Three Degrees and The Carpenters have brought cases against their record companies for alleged unpaid royalties. And the modern move towards streaming services, like Spotify and Jay Z’s Tidal, has brought a plethora of cases where artists said they have not been adequately compensated for the use of their music.

Read Article: CoinDesk

The Great Unbundling

The music industry, meanwhile, has, at least relative to newspapers, come out of the shift to the Internet in relatively good shape; while piracy drove the music labels into the arms of Apple, which unbundled the album into the song, streaming has rewarded the integration of back catalogs and new music with bundle economics: more and more users are willing to pay $10/month for access to everything, significantly increasing the average revenue per customer.

Read Article: Stratechery by Ben Thompson

Pandora to Roll Out Muted Video, Responsive Display Ads to All Advertisers

istock_000014138789_mediumPandora will roll out its Muted Video and Responsive Mobile Display ads to all advertisers on January 19. These new ad formats drive compelling results across the key performance indicators marketers care about most: time spent with ads, brand favorability and intent to purchase.

Originally introduced in June 2016 to select beta partners including Denny’s, Express, Google, the Lexus Dealer Association and Ascent Protein, Pandora’s new mobile ad formats – the first in the company’s Visual Ad Experience suite – present rich display and video ads within the square space typically reserved for album art, leveraging responsive design to seamlessly adjust ads to any phone’s screen size. Continue reading Pandora to Roll Out Muted Video, Responsive Display Ads to All Advertisers

Pandora’s Next Big Sound Creates ‘Moneyball for Music’ With Big Data

Alex White grew up surrounded by music—his father is a professional cellist and he’s played in several rock bands.But while interning at Universal Music Group, he recognized that using CD sales to sign bands and influence sales decisions was an outdated strategy in the age of streaming.

So he and three Northwestern University classmates launched Next Big Sound, a Moneyball-style big data tool for the music industry. The company’s free software analyzes metrics like social media traffic, streaming statistics and listener demographic information to determine artists’ influence and popularity.

Read Article: Observer

7 Ways Streaming Music Will Change in 2017, After Another Crazy Year

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Next wave of innovation: Virtual reality

Music execs might have been caught off guard by file-sharing and other technological innovations, but the resulting wounds have taught the industry a valuable defensive tactic: Sleep—to paraphrase Napster’s one-time archnemesis Metallica—with one eye open, lest it get blindsided by change yet again.

If virtual reality is going to be as explosive as the experts predict (ballooning to nearly $30 billion in revenue by 2020), the music industry will be ready. Big names like Paul McCartney, U2, Björk, Coldplay, and Deadmau5 are just a few of the artists who have already embraced V.R. in the form of immersive music videos or live concerts that invite fans onstage.

 

Read Article: Fast Company