Who Still Steals Music These Days?

Despite music being everywhere online these days and available to anybody who wants to listen to their favorite tunes while still supporting the artists in one way or another, millions of people are still stealing music. It’s a sad fact, but who is actually committing these crimes and robbing musicians of the sales and royalties they deserve in today’s musical economy, which is already so customer-focused?

Read Article: Forbes

Issue #224: Revolutionizing Digital Music Through Blockchain; What Exactly Is Stream-Ripping?; The Streaming Services We’ve Lost

Revolutionizing Digital Music Through Blockchain
Revolutionizing Digital Music Through Blockchainwww.huffingtonpost.com
In the old days, kids who wanted the newest albums had to get on a bike and ride to the record store to find them.

These Are The Streaming Music Services The World Has Already Lost
These Are The Streaming Music Services The World Has Already Lostwww.forbes.com
Streaming music is an incredibly difficult business to be in, and most competitors simply can’t survive.

With Most Music Being Offered For Free, Why Is Piracy Still Growing?
With Most Music Being Offered For Free, Why Is Piracy Still Growing?www.forbes.com
There are a number of reasons why some people are stealing music, but none of them justify the action.

Blockchain can make Soundcloud a Revolutionary Music Label
Blockchain can make Soundcloud a Revolutionary Music Labelmedium.com
The world is full of extraordinary songs by artists with no fans, labels or money behind them. These songs go nowhere because exposure to audiences is carefully controlled by companies who seek to…

What Exactly Is Stream-Ripping, The New Way People Are Stealing Music
What Exactly Is Stream-Ripping, The New Way People Are Stealing Musicwww.forbes.com
The music industry experienced one of the rockiest transitions into the digital age of almost any business over 15 years ago, as it didn’t lead the charge. The biggest companies working in music were more than happy to continue to allow people to purchase albums and CD singles, overlooking the potential that the internet could…

Facebook Messenger now makes Spotify suggestions based on your conversations
Facebook Messenger now makes Spotify suggestions based on your conversationswww.theverge.com
Facebook Messenger’s intelligent assistant M now delivers Spotify suggestions when music is brought up in conversation. The prompts are triggered by a variety of phrases and specific words. For…

Streaming makes full albums less necessary, muse Muse
Streaming makes full albums less necessary, muse Musewww.completemusicupdate.com

The way that the shift to streaming is changing patterns in music consumption is putting Muse off making a new album. So, you know, there’s always a silver lining.

Will radio kill the internet star?
Will radio kill the internet star?www.thedrum.com
It was the fall of 1999, and I was in a dormitory room on the top floor of Boston University’s French House – the building where I lived during most of university except during a later summer journalism internship in London in 2001.

The iPod's legacy: How Apple's music player reshuffled its future
The iPod's legacy: How Apple's music player reshuffled its futurewww.zdnet.com
The iPod served as a bridge between Apple as a PC maker mounting a comeback to purveyor of the world’s strongest ecosystem spanning hardware, software and services.

Metallica’s Lars Ulrich on Streaming
Metallica’s Lars Ulrich on Streamingvariety.com
Metallica’s Lars Ulrich talked about streaming services, “Hardwired” going platinum, and being knighted in Denmark.

What Exactly Is Stream-Ripping, The New Way People Are Stealing Music

The music industry experienced one of the rockiest transitions into the digital age of almost any business over 15 years ago, as it didn’t lead the charge. The biggest companies working in music were more than happy to continue to allow people to purchase albums and CD singles, overlooking the potential that the internet could have offered for the field.

The business only truly got its act together (at least somewhat) when the public latched onto piracy websites like Limewire and Napster and began downloading anything and everything they could want for free. That kicked off a decade-plus-long slump in the industry that has only just recently been reversed thanks to streaming platforms taking over the world.

Read Article: Forbes

RIAA Exec: 2017 Will be a “Critical Year” for Music Law

musicWhich lawsuits will you be watching most closely in the coming year? 

2017 is shaping up to be a critical year for music law. The Copyright Royalty Tribunal will set the rates that SiriusXM will pay sound recording copyright owners during the years 2018-22. To date, SiriusXM has benefited from below market rates set by the CRB under the so-called 801(b) standard. This rate standard does not require a marketplace rate, and the cost to artists and labels over the last 10 years is in the hundreds of millions if not billions. The result: a subsidy for SiriusXM as it has built an enormously profitable business. SoundExchange, representing artists and labels, is trying to restore some balance so that SiriusXM pays rates more in line with those that would be negotiated in the market. SiriusXM is asking for rates to be reduced. The decision is due by December 2017.

As the music marketplace has transitioned to streaming, the industry is seeing a rise in services that enable “stream-ripping,” which essentially copy and download music from a service intended only for streaming music or music videos. Stream-ripping undermines both streaming and download services. After all, why bother subscribing to Spotify if you can download all the music from YouTube? The industry has taken action against the largest stream-ripping site in the world, youtube-mp3.org. The case should be underway in earnest next year.

Read Article: Hollywood Reporter

Lefsetz on Stream Ripping

getty-digital-music-headphones_largeThe CD killed home taping. Did you really want to spend all that time making an inferior copy when the original sounded so much better?

Of course not. Never mind that CDs were vastly overpriced, didn’t compensate creators for said increase and singles were cut from the catalog, forcing you to buy a whole album to get the one good song you wanted.

In other words, the music industry fought the battle of the past by entering the future.

Source: Lefsetz Letter

Music Industry’s Latest Piracy Threat: Stream Ripping

Earlier this year, a federal judge shut down the free music-download site Mp3skull.com and awarded $22 million to the record companies that had sued it for copyright infringement.

But Mp3skull.onl, which has surfaced in its place, is touting a service even more worrisome to the music industry: stream ripping.

That practice, which involves turning a song or music video played on a streaming service into a permanent download, is growing fast among young music fans, even as other forms of music piracy wane.

Source: WSJ

Streaming Exclusives May Be Making the Music Piracy Problem Even Worse

While the music industry’s largely grown silent about it, piracy is still the go-to music consumption method for millions of people.

According to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, about 20 percent of internet users accessed pirated content in 2014.

That tracks with the findings of a study by the research firm MusicWatch, which found that 57 million people in the United States pirated songs last year, or about 20 percent of the country’s online users. Some of them are still pirating the old-school way, with 22 million people using peer-to-peer networks like BitTorrent.

But millions more have found increasingly modern means that are often better suited for mobile devices. For instance, ripping songs from streams on platforms like YouTube is now nearly as popular as downloading from a peer-to-peer platform.

Source: The Ringer

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