The Revolution Will be Blockchained: Blockchains and the Future of Digital Music

Some technological revolutions come suddenly, others come slowly, but this one is coming in regimented ten minute updates to a distributed public ledger. Heralded as the next great step forward for the Internet, blockchain technology is already turning heads in the finance world, and is attracting major investment interest around the globe.

While much of the focus on the application of blockchain technology is centred on improving the efficiency of the financial sector, this technology has the potential to disrupt the music industry as well.

Read Article: Growling WLG

Nielsen Launches Audio Data Management Platform

Nielsen today announced that Westwood One, America’s largest radio network, has selected Nielsen Marketing Cloud and its advanced data management platform (Nielsen DMP) to launch the first-ever audio DMP.

This ushers in an era of highly specific radio audience targeting. Advertisers can now make sharper buying decisions across Westwood One’s over-the-air radio and streaming audio channels, which reach almost a quarter of a billion listeners weekly across all U.S. media markets.

“Purchase-based marketing is now a long-awaited reality for our advertisers, and proudly a first-mover advantage for Westwood One,” said Suzanne Grimes, EVP, Corporate Marketing, Cumulus Media and President, Westwood One. “Radio now offers specificity of audience alongside the biggest reach in media. We are embracing Nielsen’s big data capabilities to enable our advertisers to identify and reach their best customers across every radio format we offer at an extremely high degree of accuracy.”

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Blockchain Could Help Musicians Make Money Again

Imogen Heap writes: As a musician, I want to encourage other artists to collaborate with my music. But recently, a visual artist had all of his Vimeo videos taken down for using just 30 seconds of one of my songs. The label that exclusively licenses one of my songs likely had a bot looking for copyright infringement that automatically took it down. I hear the artist now has them back online after a few weeks of hair loss and negotiations. I’d personally like to avoid these types of situations in the future, which means providing an easy way for others to license and collaborate with my music. A blockchain-empowered rights and payments layer could provide the means to do so.

A major pain point for creatives in the music industry — such as songwriters, producers and musicians — is that they are the first to put in any of the work, and the last to ever see any profit. They have little to no information about how their royalty payments are calculated, and don’t get access to valuable aggregate data about how and where people are listening to their music.

Read Article: HBR

Glastonbury Social Sharing Will Use 40 Terabytes of EE Data

Phone firm EE has said it will be setting up the “most powerful temporary 4G network seen at any UK event” for this month’s Glastonbury Festival, where it is the “official technology and communications partner” no less.

All that power is necessary because of all the live streaming nonsense that has become popular on the social networks in the last year. EE reckons that fad means more content will be digitally streamed and shared from Worthy Farm than ever before this month, with 40 terabytes of data likely to be used across its 4G network.

Read Article: CMU

Music Data Should Not Become ‘Part of an Arms Race’, says PRS CEO

Addressing PRS members and the wider industry at the society’s Annual General Meeting (AGM), he said that sharing intelligence and working together are essential to ensuring ‘the right people are paid the right money as fast and accurately as possible’.

As recorded music returns to growth, it has attracted both venture capital and private equity investors, Ashcroft explained.

‘Music properties, companies servicing, or owning musical assets and rights, are once again fashionable acquisition targets’ he continued.

Read Article: M Magazine

How Data is Transforming the Music Industry

Fifteen years ago, Steve Jobs introduced the iPod. Since then, most music fans have understood this has radically changed how they listen to music.

Less understood are the ways that raw information – accumulated via downloads, apps and online searches – is influencing not only what songs are marketed and sold, but which songs become hits.

Decisions about how to market and sell music, to some extent, still hinge upon subjective assumptions about what sounds good to an executive, or which artists might be easier to market. Increasingly, however, businesses are turning to big data and the analytics that can help turn this information into actions.

Read Article: The Conversation

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