Playster Partners with 7digital, Set to Launch Revamped Music Platform

playsterPlayster, the world’s first all-in-one entertainment streaming service, has inked a deal with premier digital music platform 7digital to power its revamped music catalog.

The newly unveiled collaboration with the London-based company, known for partnering with musical.ly, HMV, Technics and Onkyo, comes as a teaser ahead of Playster’s huge music announcement, which will include the addition of millions of songs from both major label and indie artists.

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Amazon to Launch Music Streaming Service

Amazon plans to a launch a music streaming service as early as next month, according to the Financial Times.

The company is reportedly wrapping up deals with the world’s largest record labels.

In terms of price, Amazon would charge subscribers $9.99 a month, which is what Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal and Google Play all charge. And Amazon isn’t the only looking to enter this space. Pandora is reportedly also wrapping up agreements with major record companies. While Amazon currently offers music streaming services, it’s only free for Amazon Prime subscribers and isn’t very expansive.

Its library offers “over a million” tunes according to the website, compared to the more than 30 million songs on Apple Music and Spotify.

It’s likely Amazon’s new service will have more to offer.

Source: marketplace.org

Even Spotify Is Surprised by the Huge Success of Its Discover Weekly Playlists

Spotify’s secret sauce of algorithmic playlists didn’t happen by accident. But its rapid growth—and rabid fan reaction—kind of did.

It’s been a little over a year since the streaming music service launched its Discovery Weekly feature, which has since become a must-listen fixture for customers around the world. As of this May, more than 5 billion tracks had been streamed on Discover Weekly playlists. While the company hasn’t officially updated that number since summer began, Spotify senior product owner Matt Ogle tells Adweek the total is now likely around 6 billion or 7 billion streams.

Source: Adweek

VuHaus Unites the Best Video from Tastemaker Public Radio Stations, Creates Eye-Candy Platform for Intriguing Music by Emerging Artists

Screen Shot 2016-07-21 at 12.06.50 PM Public radio stations around the country were early in the game of shooting high-quality video of musical guests–big names, indie darlings, emerging voices–who come by the studio. Now VuHaus gathers these once-scattered treats onto one sleek, discovery-enabling platform.

With new video coming regularly from music heavyweights like KCRW (LA), WFUV (NYC), KEXP (Seattle), and KUTX (Austin), as well as from established names like Mountain Stage, and WXPN (Philadelphia) / World Café, VuHaus bursts with eclectic sights and sounds. Genre-agnostic, the site’s curation team and special guest artists put together timely and thematic playlists, and introduce new artists of note.

Before VuHaus, public radio stations in major markets were hosting video sessions and tossing them up on YouTube. Musicians would stop by, lay down some amazing performances, and that was that. While the resulting videos would garner views aplenty, they didn’t capture the stations’ spirit, keep viewers engaged, introduce them with similar bands, or help music fans benefit from public radio’s proven track record of uncovering the best in music.

“Stations were invested in video, but weren’t getting anything out of it,” notes Mike Henry, a long-time public radio consultant and one of the driving forces behind VuHaus. “They started a dialog between themselves. We sat down and decided on a website, a branded way to face the consumer that wasn’t overtly public radio.”

The interface is purposefully minimalist and easy to navigate.

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Chris Robinson of Black Crowes on Spotify, Vinyl

Chris Robinson:

“I do find it funny as a grown adult who’s spent the majority of his life playing music that music is so cheap. You can’t go in a movie theater and videotape that film, and then watch it. You can’t go to a Broadway show and take pictures. You’re not allowed to do that stuff, but you can come to a concert, and your song is free. You wrote the song, but so what? It doesn’t mean anything.

Not that you write songs for them only to be worth something, because they should be worth the poetic nature that they’re born of. But how far does that measure?

When it comes to streaming — well, I do have a record collection, and I like having it. Who’s to say that’s the way it’s always going to be? If every musician got together and we all showed up at one time at the Spotify office — like if thousands of us went over there, and started taking whatever we wanted — I’m sure they would change their practices. But then they’d probably call in the state militia, or whatever.”

Source: Digital Trends

Apple Music Needs More Mobile Duets

Apple has hitched itself to music celebrities to pitch Apple Music, the $10-a-month digital service launched a year ago. There was the very public catering to Taylor Swift. Apple broke out its checkbook for exclusive rights to albums from Frank Ocean and Chance the Rapper. Trent Reznor from Nine Inch Nails and Dr. Dre are Apple executives now. Apple Music is so beyond cool it’s frozen.

But to take Apple Music mainstream, Apple needs to cozy up not only to the hip musicians but also to the dull guys in suits who run the world’s mobile phone companies. They won’t get Tim Cook into hot parties, but the phone companies are crucial to Apple Music’s future.

Source: Bloomberg Gadfly

IndieSurge Makes its Debut as a New Music Streaming Platform

indie-surgeIndieSurge is a new music streaming service focused on delivering the latest music from up-and-coming artists to listeners who are interested in something new.

By letting artists upload their music to the IndieSurge platform, they will be able to reach new audiences, while providing music fans with the fresh music that they will enjoy listening to.

Similar to a speed dating service, IndieSurge will let music fans sample a variety of songs they might like and then narrow down which bands they want to have a long-term relationship with.

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